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kaytee February 15, 2013 12:39 PM

Lake Cabin Without Climate Control
 
Hello Fellow Flooring Folks!

I have a customer who is interested in the best possible flooring option for a lake cabin with no climate control that gets freezing temperatures for months at a time.

What products would you recommend? We understand that manufacturers won't warranty their products in this setting.

Floating, commercial grade click LVT such as the Naturals collection by T.A.S. is what I have recommended. Is there something out there that would work better?

(plywood subfloor)

Elmer Fudd February 15, 2013 12:41 PM

Quote:

kaytee said (Post 175946)
Hello Fellow Flooring Folks!

I have a customer who is interested in the best possible flooring option for a lake cabin with no climate control that gets freezing temperatures for months at a time.

What products would you recommend? We understand that manufacturers won't warranty their products in this setting.

Floating, commercial grade click LVT such as the Naturals collection by T.A.S. is what I have recommended. Is there something out there that would work better?

(plywood subfloor)

Natural Bearskins, it's what all the oldtimers used. ;)

kaytee February 15, 2013 01:40 PM

Ha ha ha! I like the way you think Elmer.

Hanover Fist February 15, 2013 02:05 PM

Whole raw wood with an oil-based finish should hold up pretty well in such a situation, it's what old-timey floors have been made of for hundreds of years (prior to central air)

Ceramic Tile too - especially if installed over Ditra-mat, but there's a fragility issue in temps like that...so long as it's unoccupied (no traffic at all) and stays dry during sub-freezing temps, it's fairly bulletproof.

Carpet isn't a bad idea either, but it can lose stretch if temps fluctuate overmuch - in a part-time cabin though, wrinkles n' such are kind of expected.

But if it were my place, I'd go whole wood, either sand & finish or pre-finished.
---And if you go the sand & finish route, go with a good strong oil-based urethane, only one or two coats, though. Urethane tends to create its own surface layer when the wood grows/shrinks too much, which it will, and may flake free of its bond if that layer is thick enough.
-Water based wouldn't last 3 years.

kylenelson February 15, 2013 04:15 PM

Ceramic tile and stretched in carpet. I have installed floating click-lock vinyl planks in a house that a contractor decided to leave a gaping hole (replacing sliding glass door) open for three days in 30 degree weather, needless to say, the planks separated at the weakest spot. It was a fixable problem, but a problem nonetheless.


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