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Dining room engineered floor with border



"Dining room engineered floor with border," in the Hardwood and Laminates Q&A forum, begins: "I'm installing engineered 7 1/8" wide 3/4" Walnut boards on a new subfloor. I've read this step by step but ..."

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Old June 22, 2011, 11:19 AM   #1
wpeters1
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Dining room engineered floor with border


I'm installing engineered 7 1/8" wide 3/4" Walnut boards on a new subfloor. I've read this step by step but I didn't quite get some of the points they were making regarding the order of installation.
I don't really want to glue down any of the boards onto the subfloor and I don't have an undercut floor slot cutting bit for the router. I do have a 1/4" slot cutting bit for my shaper or mounted router if its required.

On the attached sketch I've numbered the steps and would like your opinion and suggestions regarding the procedure and methods.

I'd be starting at the top left-hand corner by installing the picture frame boards #1 & 2, followed by the first board in the field #3, then #4 the first bottom board in the picture frame. I was hoping that #5 could be cut to length and tapped in using the factory tongue at the bottom end.

The boards are wide enough that I can use the pneumatic nailer to nail the first board to the wall and the the second last board to the opposite wall, I'd then have to face nail the edges which will be under the baseboard anyway.

There will be an inlay of a simple decorative border into two channels dadoed into the second picture frame boards all the way around, this will be glued and fitted into the boards prior to installation.

Thanks, Bill

ps. the varying colors in the diagram are there to make it easier to distinguish the individual boards, they are all walnut with the exception of thin maple/wenge inlays.
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Old June 23, 2011, 03:28 PM   #2
eJM
 
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I hope a pro will be along shortly to answer your questions. In the mean time, here's a large assortment of router bits: Amazon.com: router bits - Tools & Home Improvement

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Old June 23, 2011, 04:53 PM   #3
wpeters1
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Thank eJM, actually I have a bunch of router bits which include a 1/4" slot cutting bit for the mitered corners. The only bit I dont have is an undercut slot cutting bit and unfortunately due to the canadian postal strike I can't order one from the US, I've looked everywhere here and can't find one that is suitable.

However with the above layout and order of work I won't need to slot cut any of the boards on the floor and the miters can be done on the shaper.
Before I can start I'd like to get some confirmation that the above layout will work, or did I miss something. I know there are quite a few ways of doing this but this plan doesn't require any slot cutting on the floor.

Thanks, Bill.

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Old June 23, 2011, 09:51 PM   #4
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Don't think it will work well.

Do your center(field) first and then do your outside border. Easier to keep square.

Can you get a biscuit cutter?

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Old June 24, 2011, 07:31 AM   #5
wpeters1
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stullis said View Post
Don't think it will work well.
Do your center(field) first and then do your outside border. Easier to keep square.
Can you get a biscuit cutter?
I have a Festool Domino which is similar. With the Domino you can get a perfect alignment vertically and create a larger width slot to allow for some play, similar to a small floating tenon. The problem is I don't have a circular saw to cut the end of the field, all my tools are large stationary type.

However, if you have a moment I'd appreciate if you can briefly explain where the problem would be. I have done quite a bit of research before posting and some of the builders seem to lay two sides of the border first, followed by the field then the remainder.

Thank you for your help,
Bill

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Old June 24, 2011, 07:51 AM   #6
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Problem is keeping the 2 sides square enough. Sure you can do it that way but it is more time consuming.

You wouldn't need a circular saw as all boards can be properly sized and grooved prior to placement. Even your miters could be slotted prior to placement.

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Old June 24, 2011, 08:09 AM   #7
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stullis said View Post
Problem is keeping the 2 sides square enough. Sure you can do it that way but it is more time consuming.

You wouldn't need a circular saw as all boards can be properly sized and grooved prior to placement. Even your miters could be slotted prior to placement.
I think I see what your getting at, I could place a temporary board down at one end and butt the field boards up to that, and then get the other end as aligned as possible using small cuts at the tablesaw and then add a groove.

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Old June 24, 2011, 08:31 AM   #8
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Yep, any method will work, I just find doing the field first and adding the borders works easier and faster for me.

This is true whether working with wood or other materials like tile or vinyl products.

All the methods require keeping things square and taking your time with layout and planning.

For a temporary board I use the factory edges of plywood. Those are nice and straight in comparison to trying to find a straight board of other wood.

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Old June 24, 2011, 09:17 AM   #9
wpeters1
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Scott.

Thank you very much for your explanation, its making sense. I`ll begin with a center line down the middle of the room.

Ėve worked out that the width of the floor is about 3/4 (of a board) shy of a full board. If I was to split the difference and put shorter boards at either side of the field, or is there a better way.

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Old June 24, 2011, 11:55 AM   #10
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wpeters1 said View Post
Scott.

Thank you very much for your explanation, its making sense. I`ll begin with a center line down the middle of the room.

Ėve worked out that the width of the floor is about 3/4 (of a board) shy of a full board. If I was to split the difference and put shorter boards at either side of the field, or is there a better way.
Why not make the field finish with a full board? Re-figure the length to keep the same perimeter distance from all walls. Or haven't I been paying attention?

There's no rule that says you have to use the factory tongue either. I had to use splines (slip tongues) lots of times. But in the field, factory tongues and grooves where the ends join is the norm. Don't try to make all your ends where they meet the border factory ends.

What I might do is dry fit the first long side border board as the starting point of my field. Install the field with the proper amount of stagger between end joins. A chalk line will help prevent the ends that will join the border from being too short. Once all the field is laid, I would set aside the loose border board and use a circular saw and straight edge to cut the field ends square and parallel. Then router a groove into them and run a little matching stain over the ends for a bit of insurance (this doesn't apply to unfinished hardwood). Now you can lay your borders and then the rest of the flooring.

A circular saw is a good tool to invest in. This is the same saw I used for years and still own: Porter Cable Saw Boss 6" Circular Saw 345 It's small, has dust control and I like the blade on the left side because I'm right-handed. With a 40-tooth blade like this: Timberline 150-400 Contractor 6-Inch Diameter by 40-Teeth by 1/2-Inch Bore, ATB Grind Thin Kerf Carbide Tipped Saw Blade and a little tape, you can make your cuts splinter free.

Jim

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Old June 24, 2011, 12:20 PM   #11
wpeters1
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Jim McClain said View Post
Why not make the field finish with a full board? Re-figure the length to keep the same perimeter distance from all walls. Or haven't I been paying attention?
Jim
The problem is if I make the field finish with a full board then I have to rip one of the border boards down.

Example
Total floor width is 132 3/4"
Field = 15 boards @ 7 1/8" = 106 7/8"
Leaves 25 7/8" for the border and each board is 7 1/8" wide
so there isn't enough room for the four boards.

I though that the best of the worst appearence would be to make the two
end field boards approx 6 1/4" in width.

Re: circular saw - about 5 years ago I began collecting Festool so if I get a saw it will be a Festool and it isn't in my budget at this point in time, perhaps later in the year. So I wil stick with Scotts suggestion by using one of the boards to butt the field onto and will make the first board a spine joint along its length.

Appreciate your input Jim.

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