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Poorly installed flooring



"Poorly installed flooring," in the Hardwood and Laminates Q&A forum, begins: "I had a laminate floor installed about 3 years ago. We installed our own baseboard and quarter round. Now I ..."

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Old August 10, 2012, 10:18 AM   #1
CherylF
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Poorly installed flooring


I had a laminate floor installed about 3 years ago. We installed our own baseboard and quarter round. Now I am taking out the old baseboard and quarter round, because we did a bad job initially. I noticed I now have a large gap between the laminate floor and the wall. I've already put new baseboard up, but am wondering what I can use that's wide enough to cover the gap. 3/4" quarter round isn't wide enough. Need your help.

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Old August 10, 2012, 10:30 AM   #2
Barry Carlton
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Cheryl, I mover your post to a forum that will be more likely to sooner receive an answer

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Old August 10, 2012, 10:40 AM   #3
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I am afraid I don't understand, did you have the gap originally?

If not you are probably using thinner baseboard, that has nothing to do with the installers. If the gap has always been there why did you not address it 3 years ago?

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Old August 10, 2012, 10:52 AM   #4
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Elmer Fudd said View Post
I am afraid I don't understand, did you have the gap originally?

If not you are probably using thinner baseboard, that has nothing to do with the installers. If the gap has always been there why did you not address it 3 years ago?
Fuddy Duddy, unless I misread her OP she said "we did a bad job"

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Old August 10, 2012, 12:14 PM   #5
CherylF
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The gaps may have been there, but I'm not sure they were that bad. I am not an expert and wasn't aware there should only be a certain amount of space. We did a bad job on the baseboard and quarter round initially, so I decided to redo them. I just noticed though that the gaps seem to be larger since putting the new baseboard in and I used the same size baseboard. (In our living room the floors have pulled away even worse.) After putting the new baseboard down a couple days ago, it dawned on me that I will need something wider to cover the gap. I really don't want to take the baseboard up again. Is there a wider quarter round that might work?

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Old August 10, 2012, 12:56 PM   #6
Rhodes Hardwood
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CherylF said View Post
The gaps may have been there, but I'm not sure they were that bad. I am not an expert and wasn't aware there should only be a certain amount of space. We did a bad job on the baseboard and quarter round initially, so I decided to redo them. I just noticed though that the gaps seem to be larger since putting the new baseboard in and I used the same size baseboard. (In our living room the floors have pulled away even worse.) After putting the new baseboard down a couple days ago, it dawned on me that I will need something wider to cover the gap. I really don't want to take the baseboard up again. Is there a wider quarter round that might work?

You may want to get bigger baseboards and then use quarter round oo. This should hide the gap around the perimeter.

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Old August 10, 2012, 01:14 PM   #7
Darol Wester
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Unless I'm missing something, if you're putting the same width base and 1/4 round back that you took out and there's NOW a gap, but wasn't before....... Me thinks the new baseboard isn't as wide as the old one was.

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Old August 10, 2012, 01:16 PM   #8
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CherylF said View Post
The gaps may have been there, but I'm not sure they were that bad. I am not an expert and wasn't aware there should only be a certain amount of space. We did a bad job on the baseboard and quarter round initially, so I decided to redo them. I just noticed though that the gaps seem to be larger since putting the new baseboard in and I used the same size baseboard. (In our living room the floors have pulled away even worse.) After putting the new baseboard down a couple days ago, it dawned on me that I will need something wider to cover the gap. I really don't want to take the baseboard up again. Is there a wider quarter round that might work?
Add a baseboard that is lower in height then the 1/4 round for a retro elegant profile look.

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Old August 10, 2012, 03:55 PM   #9
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What's the humidity levels in your house? is it really dry? I've seen some expansion and contraction in my time but contracting enough to not allow base and shoe to cover, (almost an inch) is crazy!

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Old August 10, 2012, 05:35 PM   #10
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Cheryl,

Here's my guess based on my own personal experience.

A laminate floor is a "floating floor". The entire floor (slab) can move due to traffic patterns in the room. My guess is the entire floor has shifted. Check the side opposite the large gap and see if the gap there is very narrow.

If so, take all of the load off of the floor. Move the furniture out of the room and on the narrow side of the room see if you can pry the entire floor back into its original location.

THEN, squeeze some one-inch long daubs of 100% silicone in the wall-gap about every twenty-four inches along all of the walls. You WILL have to remove the new baseboard to do this.

In the old days when laminate flooring first came on the scene it was common in my experience to see shifting floor installations after being in use for a time. It all has to do with where and how you pivot your feet to make turns as you traverse the area. Seems minor but it is a fact.

PS...It is also possible to move the entire floor simply by jumping on it while at the same time exerting some forward pressure in your jumping action. The floor can't have any weight on it anywhere with the exception of your own body weight.

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Old August 10, 2012, 11:14 PM   #11
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Thats what I think too. Look on the opposing wall, is the gap smaller?

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Old August 11, 2012, 04:58 PM   #12
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I guarantee you Bud is right.

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Old August 11, 2012, 06:11 PM   #13
Darol Wester
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That's a very good thought, but why wasn't it a problem before they took the base off?

OK. After reading Cheryl's second post, I guess there's a possibility that there was a little gap there.

I came back on a job I did and found the material away from the base simply because the kids were running around the corner in the hall which slowly pushed the boards in one direction enough to expose the opposite edge a tiny bit. I just stomped it back over and explained what was happening. I'm sure a whole room could do the same with a similar push in the same direction.


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Old August 11, 2012, 06:44 PM   #14
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Darol Wester said View Post
That's a very good thought, but why wasn't it a problem before they took the base off?
**************************
good question Darol

I have two possible scenarios

#1 no one was LOOKING for gaps

#2 to some extent the base was pressed down tight enough during installation-----"locking in" the laminate from shifting------as much as they'd ever notice when they're not crawling on their hands and knees fussing about the base and quarter round.

Now they're seeing things they never concerned themselves over

there are plenty of alternative explanations

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Old August 11, 2012, 07:17 PM   #15
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I won't go into details but I can tell you that a bed can also move a floor laterally. It's true.

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