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Mannington Adura Vinyl Planks & Congoleum Duraplanks



"Mannington Adura Vinyl Planks & Congoleum Duraplanks," in the Vinyl Flooring Q&A forum, begins: "Yeah, everyone is absolutely right. I no longer have any hope that this can be a DIY project. I appreciate ..."

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Old June 22, 2010, 04:47 PM   #16
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Yeah, everyone is absolutely right. I no longer have any hope that this can be a DIY project. I appreciate all the input.

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Old June 22, 2010, 04:50 PM   #17
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We're using the Mannington vinyl planks in quite a few different commercial settings. You can't wear that stuff out an you don't really see the scratches or gouges depending on the color and lighting. Like many, if not most vinyl planks with the wood look people who don't know what they're walking on think it's actually wood.

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Old June 22, 2010, 05:18 PM   #18
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Incognito said View Post
We're using the Mannington vinyl planks in quite a few different commercial settings. You can't wear that stuff out an you don't really see the scratches or gouges depending on the color and lighting. Like many, if not most vinyl planks with the wood look people who don't know what they're walking on think it's actually wood.
Well, I do appreciate hearing that, because this is going to cost a BUNDLE. Hopefully it will make up for the initial cost by being both attractive and durable for a long time, though. Have you had any experience with the lighter color of Vintage Oak?

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Old June 22, 2010, 05:57 PM   #19
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stullis said View Post
Self leveling over a wood substrate is a bit different than using SLC on a concrete slab.
We routinely tell customers that Self-Levelling Compound still has to be trowelled, it doesn't just spread out nice and level on its own. We smoothed out that basement over 4 days. Up to 3 coats in some areas. Lots of trowelling, lots of scraping.

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Old June 23, 2010, 02:43 AM   #20
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zivatar said View Post
Well, I do appreciate hearing that, because this is going to cost a BUNDLE. Hopefully it will make up for the initial cost by being both attractive and durable for a long time, though. Have you had any experience with the lighter color of Vintage Oak?
Yes, that sounds familiar. I'm sure I've use it somewhere. I'm a commercial installer almost exclusively. I recommend lighter colors in these vinyl wood planks because almost any kind of damage you could ever do would fairly easily "hide" with a good cleaning and coat of finish. I'm talking about supermarkets and department stores where they offload 10-25 tractor trailers a night of merchandise which the store people who stock the shelves are not all that concerned with how the floor holds up to their dragging pallets and carts around with hundreds of pounds of boxes. It's amazing what the maintenance guys in these stores can do with that kind of abuse.

I can't imagine for a second that you could ever have a problem in a home with this kind of material unless you were maliciously trying to damage it. There's nothing special about the Mannington product. All the one's I've worked with have been solid products. The customers seem to be very happy with it and I'm seeing more and more of this style product.


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Old June 23, 2010, 04:06 AM   #21
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mcbrides said View Post
We routinely tell customers that Self-Levelling Compound still has to be trowelled, it doesn't just spread out nice and level on its own. We smoothed out that basement over 4 days. Up to 3 coats in some areas. Lots of trowelling, lots of scraping.
**
But what confuses me most is that you said you only used 6 (22 lb.) bags of patch.

How could six bags of patch run into four day work?

Have you ever tried Ardex K-15 or Feather Finish?

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Old June 23, 2010, 07:52 AM   #22
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I believe Konecto/Adura and Duraplank use aluminum oxide in their finishing process. Armstrong doesn't with their Luxe Plank, they use urethane on their entry level product and urethane plus on the better and best lines. I have their cheap grade in my basement (low traffic) and it is extremely durable.
Aluminum Oxide is clear metal particles and the hardest surface on the earth besides diamonds. Which in turn makes the surface very scratch/wear and scuff resistant.
All good wearing products for you.
Take some before and after pictures

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Old June 23, 2010, 07:53 AM   #23
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Incognito said View Post
**
But what confuses me most is that you said you only used 6 (22 lb.) bags of patch.

How could six bags of patch run into four day work?

Have you ever tried Ardex K-15 or Feather Finish?
Some areas of the concrete was rougher than others. There were a whole lot of furnishings in our way (that explains timing). Ardex Featherlite is really hard to get here ~ we would have had to go into Toronto for it.

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Old June 23, 2010, 09:35 AM   #24
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Yeah Ardex is good stuff.

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Old June 23, 2010, 03:36 PM   #25
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mcbrides said View Post
Some areas of the concrete was rougher than others. There were a whole lot of furnishings in our way (that explains timing). Ardex Featherlite is really hard to get here ~ we would have had to go into Toronto for it.
**
Wow, furniture! That's going to slow things down for sure.

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Old June 24, 2010, 07:36 AM   #26
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Incognito said View Post
**
Wow, furniture! That's going to slow things down for sure.
All we do is residential retrofit, Brian, there is always furniture in our way. Not to mention that the basement was so cold (had them turn off their a/c for several days), the patch took ages to set up, even with heat guns.
We were paid well, though.

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Old June 25, 2010, 10:15 AM   #27
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All of the comments have been so helpful and enlightening and have really helped to reinforce the decision to go with professionally installed Adura Distinctive Series Vinyl Planks in Vintage Oak. It has been a difficult decision as most of my friends cannot fathom spending that kind of money on "vinyl." The area has not been measured yet but it will be around 1000 square feet. Am I correct in interpreting the previous posts to be saying that I will need to have 1/4" plywood installed over the OSB in order to get this "glass-like" prepared surface? Or would that be overkill?

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Old June 25, 2010, 10:23 AM   #28
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And as a follow-up to the question in my previous post about the 1/4" plywood underlayment, then should the installation actually be on the underlayment that rolls out and is stapled to the plywood underlayment (sorry I don't know the name for this stuff, but you roll it out and tape it together and staple it down, then apply the glue to it instead of directly to the plywood)? My understanding is that the floor is then much more easily removed in the future (not that I want to go through this again anytime soon, but I am currently ripping out vinyl glued to the 1/4" underlayment in the kitchen and it is proving EXTREMELY difficult to do). In other words, then you would have two underlayments, the 1/4" plywood and the roll-out kind on top of that. And another question: are there different kinds of plywood? The kind I am ripping out now is splintering all over the place and NOT "popping up" in sheets as my retailer told me it would do when I removed it. Thanks.

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Old June 25, 2010, 11:13 AM   #29
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"I'm talking about supermarkets and department stores where they offload 10-25 tractor trailers a night of merchandise which the store people who stock the shelves are not all that concerned with how the floor holds up to their dragging pallets and carts around with hundreds of pounds of boxes. It's amazing what the maintenance guys in these stores can do with that kind of abuse."


All the material used in Von's, Safeway's, Wal Mart and most of the National Retailers using LVT are a Urethane finish. This is what enables them to wax and maintain the finish. I don't believe Aluminum Oxide can be maintained the same way.

We manufacture most of the products used by the National Retailers (Wal Mart, Von's, Children's World, etc. Home Goods and the old Expo stores were made by another manufacturer) and we both use Urethane finishes.

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Old June 25, 2010, 11:48 AM   #30
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zivatar said View Post
And as a follow-up to the question in my previous post about the 1/4" plywood underlayment, then should the installation actually be on the underlayment that rolls out and is stapled to the plywood underlayment (sorry I don't know the name for this stuff, but you roll it out and tape it together and staple it down, then apply the glue to it instead of directly to the plywood)? My understanding is that the floor is then much more easily removed in the future (not that I want to go through this again anytime soon, but I am currently ripping out vinyl glued to the 1/4" underlayment in the kitchen and it is proving EXTREMELY difficult to do). In other words, then you would have two underlayments, the 1/4" plywood and the roll-out kind on top of that. And another question: are there different kinds of plywood? The kind I am ripping out now is splintering all over the place and NOT "popping up" in sheets as my retailer told me it would do when I removed it. Thanks.
Unless I missed an update, the "paper" is not attached to the substrate at all. It actually turns the LVT into a floating application. The theory is that less prep is required (in theory, eliminating the need for wood underlayments and other extensive floor prep [other than for reasons of matching height])

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