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Vinyl Plank or?



"Vinyl Plank or?," in the Vinyl Flooring Q&A forum, begins: "I am allergic to some glues (serious asthma) and need a resilient surface (age and decrepitude). I am considering plank ..."

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Old September 22, 2010, 03:29 PM   #1
Evelyn
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Vinyl Plank or?


I am allergic to some glues (serious asthma) and need a resilient surface (age and decrepitude). I am considering plank vinyl, resilient type. I will not be installing it myself. The installer is a good all-around carpenter, painter, etc., but not a flooring specialist. He has installed many types of flooring, but not the plank.

This floor is in a kitchen and the adjoining office. Present flooring is a cushioned vinyl installed about 25 years ago. It is in good conditioned, no tears or loose places. However, there are two patches. They also are tightly glued to the floor. I am hoping that the new floor can be laid over the present vinyl. If it must come up, then I will have to leave. (OK with me, but my invalid husband is a problem.)

Would plank vinyl be a good choice? Is there a better choice? What brand?

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Old September 22, 2010, 03:39 PM   #2
rusty baker
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Vinyl plank has adhesive strips. They might bother you. I would suggest loose laying IVC vinyl, but it won't work with rolling traffic.

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Old September 22, 2010, 03:40 PM   #3
Elmer Fudd
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The key word you mention here is "cushioned", almost all glue down products cannot be installed over a cushioned surface.

If you have asthma, have you checked that the off gassing from the vinyl plank will not aggravate your condition?

What brand were you thinking of?

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Old September 22, 2010, 04:38 PM   #4
Jim McClain
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Hi Evelyn,

Thanks for joining TFP. I have late-stage COPD and strong odors and fumes really throw me for a loop. Last year I installed some Konecto in the main room of my apartment. It is a floating floor like Rusty described. I had no problem with off-gassing or odors.

My bedroom will be getting another vinyl plank floor by Karndean (you might think I have a thing for "K" floors, but really, I don't ). But this floor is a direct glue-down luxury vinyl tile that looks remarkably realistic. When it arrived the other day, one of the glue buckets had been damaged and a small amount of adhesive was on the side of the bucket. I had the delivery brought inside to acclimate.

Later that night I thought the off-gassing of the material was making my breathing difficult. But then I thought it might be the adhesive. I put the damaged glue bucket outside and within a few hours everything was fine.

I'm not saying that no LVTs off-gas. Some might, but adequate ventilation for the first 24 hours should be all that's needed. If you get one that requires adhesive, the glue might be the bigger problem. I can't say what it's going to be like during my bedroom installation, but I hope it's tolerable and very temporary. I won't know for several weeks though.

As someone who can't manage spills quickly and needs a floor that is nearly maintenance free, except for vacuuming or mopping, I like vinyl plank flooring a lot. I had real hardwood before I became ill and I miss it a lot. But LVT in better qualities, especially the Karndean brand, is as good as it gets for people like you and I.

Best R'gards,

Jim

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Old September 22, 2010, 04:48 PM   #5
Tandy Reeves
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Be very careful with your "real good carpenter". I have inspected may floor failures that were installed by carpenters. They may indeed be great craftsmen in carpentry, but installing flooring products is not interchangeable with other trades without proper know how.

Use a flooring pro for floors and building pros for building. Good luck with your project.

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Old September 22, 2010, 05:52 PM   #6
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As Rg already stated I wouldn't recommend anything over a cushion vinyl. IMO it should be removed for a successful installation of any new resilient product
Konnecto or IVC would be a nice choice after removal.

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Old September 22, 2010, 07:33 PM   #7
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Tandy Reeves said View Post
Be very careful with your "real good carpenter". I have inspected may floor failures that were installed by carpenters. They may indeed be great craftsmen in carpentry, but installing flooring products is not interchangeable with other trades without proper know how.

Use a flooring pro for floors and building pros for building. Good luck with your project.
*
I'll second that!

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Old September 22, 2010, 10:27 PM   #8
stullis
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Check out a floating cork plank floor. Warmer more forgiving floor, easier install for your carpenter and you can go over your existing floor.

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Old September 23, 2010, 08:29 AM   #9
Evelyn
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Vinyl Plank or?


Thanks for all the replies. I agree that the cushioned vinyl should come up. I think I will require that they close doors to the rest of the house, turn off the central air so it won't circulate, and vacuum thoroughly when done. If I still react, I'll just have to hire someone else who doesn't have allergies to tend to my husband, and I'll leave. I'll also have my asthma inhaler handy. I know you folks didn't need to hear all that. Sorry.

The way our house is built, it is almost impossible to get a roll of sheet vinyl into the house. Last time we brought it in the window, but we now have better, but smaller windows. So, I'm back to vinyl plank. IO don't think I will be allergic to the glue. Previously I have reacted to gas particles in the air. I'll check out the ones recommended. Again. Many thanks.

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Old September 23, 2010, 03:12 PM   #10
Evelyn
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Vinyl Plank or?


The more I read, the more concerned I get. The warnings about asbestos danger while removing old sheet vinyl are alarming. Now, I’m back to looking for something that can be installed over the old floor. Does that mean a non-glued vinyl? My husband and I installed the cushion vinyl years ago. It does not now feel “cushy” underfoot now, but I believe it was “springier” originally.

Is there anything that can be “loose-laid”? It seems the “floating” vinyl plank would fill the bill, but I can’t find a manufacturer who recommends that. Again, advice, please.

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Old September 23, 2010, 03:33 PM   #11
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Evelyn said View Post
The more I read, the more concerned I get. The warnings about asbestos danger while removing old sheet vinyl are alarming.
When did ya install the floor? That can tell us if there is asbestos in the floor. Also keep in mind that the danger of asbestos is if it is fiable, or airborne particles. A knowledgable installer will wet the area down and keep all particulate out of the air so that ther is minimal danger.


Evelyn said View Post
Is there anything that can be “loose-laid”? It seems the “floating” vinyl plank would fill the bill, but I can’t find a manufacturer who recommends that. Again, advice, please.
If you "peel" the existing vinyl, eliminating the cushion, you can use most any floating vinyl plank. Konecto, properly installed is a good choice, as are products from Karndean, and Mannington. Some are glued down, others installed on a slip sheet.

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Old September 23, 2010, 11:35 PM   #12
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Must not like the look of cork.
http://www.duro-design.com/index.cfm/cork-flooring/

Another option would be the new locking system on the Adura vinyl planks.
http://www.mannington.com/Residential/Adura.aspx
No glue.

Most likely do not need to remove the vinyl with either of these products.


Last edited by stullis; September 23, 2010 at 11:51 PM.
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Old September 24, 2010, 04:41 PM   #13
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Mannington Adura has a new type of vinyl plank that clicks together. It is a "floating floor"--does not need to be glued down. Some retailers have samples now.

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Old September 25, 2010, 10:06 AM   #14
Sean Moore
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Evelyn said View Post
The more I read, the more concerned I get. The warnings about asbestos danger while removing old sheet vinyl are alarming.
The test itself is only $30 or so and comes with instructions. I'm sure some of the independent guys here could tell you their favorite test lab. I'm not sure what someone would charge to come over and do it.

I'm sure I'll be corrected quickly if wrong but I believe 1981 was the year asbestos was finally phased out of floor covering.

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Old September 26, 2010, 06:28 PM   #15
Evelyn
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After all the back and forth, I've decided to go with vinyl plank. Economy is, of course a consideration. But I also think it will answer most of my requirements. I've had a sample plank in my house in close proximity and it has caused me no problem. Thanks all of you folks for helping eaSE THE PAINB OF INDECISION.

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